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12/18/17, 06:33 AM

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Author Topic: Mountain guide death leads to Exum fine  (Read 688 times)
freeski
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Mountain guide death leads to Exum fine
« on: 11/30/17, 10:33 PM »

Below is an excerpt from an article which "underscores an emerging awareness" towards occupational hazards associated with commercial users of our public land and the need for holding accountable those who violate safe practice standards.

The need for Safe practice standards is not an easy thing convey to a bunch of skiers who think  the mountain environment is the problem when a commercial user or client is injured or dies.


In my industry as a carpenter it would be like blaming the roof if someone was injured in a fall.


http://www.wyofile.com/mountain-guide-death-leads-exum-fine/

"The investigation underscores an emerging awareness among businesses in the recreation and outdoors industry that they are subject to rules seeking to ensure safety — even in unconventional workplaces like ski resorts and wilderness areas. In recent years Wyoming OSHA has investigated the death of an ecology field worker slain and eaten by a bear or bears, a ski patroller killed in an avalanche and another patroller who died in a fall."
« Last Edit: 11/30/17, 10:37 PM by freeski » Logged

two sets of principles. They are the principles of power and privilege and the principles of truth and justice. If you pursue truth and justice it will always mean a diminution of power and privilege. If you pursue power and privilege, it will always be at the expense of truth and justice
C Hedges
Randy
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Re: Mountain guide death leads to Exum fine
« Reply #1 on: 11/30/17, 10:59 PM »

...
In my industry as a carpenter it would be like blaming the roof if someone was injured in a fall.
...

A friend of mine is director of safety for a construction firm.    After he developed and implemented a safety education program that changed the safety culture and practices in the company their injury rate reduced 90% over a two year period.
The program was started when the company owner felt too burdened by attending funerals and visiting injured workers in the hospital.  He figured it was worth it even if it cut into profits. 

What happened suprised the owner,  the company's payments into the workers compensation system were reduced dramatically, morale and retention improved markedly and productivity improved.

When a carpenter falls off a roof and is injured -- it's because a fall protection system was not being used.   Depending on a worker to never slip is a recipe for injury and death.
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freeski
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Re: Mountain guide death leads to Exum fine
« Reply #2 on: 12/03/17, 12:02 PM »

A friend of mine urged me to read the coments sections for this  Exum guide article and lo and behold this appeared...

"Paul Butler   FEBRUARY 21, 2017 AT 8:13 PM #
Dealing with a worker safety agency can sometimes lead down a black hole of nightmarish bureaucracy, an experience that is likely the antithesis to what a mountain guide generally offers. Hopefully that isn’t the case here for the employer.

Mazama, Washington"

It would seem that any organization that  places Public Safety as a primary concern would  not consider working with a government agency concerned with safety to be any type of burden.

I hope from reading the above comment, people are starting to understand why I'm stressing safety first in that area of public land in which I, my friends and my loved ones  recreate, seek solice and peaceful enjoyment.

I almost lost a friend due to (what I would allege to be) negligent actions of a local guide and
business partner with the above article commenter.

For those that don't know, that guide ski cut and triggered an avalanche down upon my friend without first ensuring that no one was In Harm's Way below. The path had a clear line of sight that day.

My friend served a distinguished career as a smokejumper only
to have his life placed in jeopardy due to the (alleged) negligence of another.

It also seems that our local Forest Service is not too concerned about having a helicopter operating in close proximity to the General Public who didn't sign a liability waiver.

It is apparently also okay with our local Forest Service to have a guide-Outfitter drop Avalanche triggers above the General Public.

I asked the District Ranger about this concern and basically he told me that it's my risk to assume because I am supposed to know that there's a helicopter operating in the area.

Tell that to a friend of mine who was topping out on the Blue Peak cornice just as the helicopter was coming in for a landing.

But that currently is the attitude of our local Forest Service and reflects a systemic disregard for safety.

Our local Forest Service does not have very good safety record concerning its own employees.

Too many firefighters have died in our area to believe it's anything other than a systemic problem within that agency. It truly does not seem that safety is a primary concern.

I almost lost another friend last year, a Heli guide who works for the local heli guide Outfitter company. He was close to death when his client group dug him out of an avalanche.

Since then I've been thinking about what role clients play in this big game of Risk in pursuit of a powder adrenaline rush. You guys basically hired my friend to risk his life to safeguard the ski descent line so you could have that experience.

Is it really worth it? Someone's life for your pleasure.

It is about time that OSHA gets involved in these safety issues. I am not burdened by this at all.

But I am starting to understand why, industry-wide, Guide-Outfitters do not desire to report their near-miss Avalanche incidents.

Maybe it's not good for business to have a governmental public safety agency scrutinizing their safety records.

But it is good for Public Safety, and that should be OUR primary concern.





« Last Edit: 12/03/17, 12:29 PM by freeski » Logged

two sets of principles. They are the principles of power and privilege and the principles of truth and justice. If you pursue truth and justice it will always mean a diminution of power and privilege. If you pursue power and privilege, it will always be at the expense of truth and justice
C Hedges
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