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Author Topic: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds  (Read 58916 times)
Amar Andalkar
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May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« on: 05/31/11, 03:26 AM »

May 29, 2011, Mount Baker, Full Ski Ascent and Descent via Easton-Deming Glaciers

Summary: Completed a full ski ascent and descent of Mount Baker via the Easton Glacier route, right from the door of the car to the summit, requiring a bit over 8000 vertical feet and roughly 20 miles roundtrip of skinning and skiing right now. The road is free of snow and driveable to 2750 ft, within 2.7 miles of the Schriebers Meadow trailhead, then almost entirely snowcovered beyond that. The crevasse conditions on route are very good, we took the western variation which is actually mostly on the Deming Glacier, with only a few incipient cracks barely starting to show in the usual places from 9000-9400 ft. Snow conditions were excellent up high, smooth proto-corn and corn (some nice firnspiegel too) with no ice even on the summit dome. Snow stability on this moderate-angle route was excellent too as expected, nothing moved or slid at all during the day, except numerous distant avalanches dropping from the steep rocky faces of the Black Buttes. Just a beautiful day of sunshine and light winds up there, above a thick cloud deck which rose throughout the day from about 3800 ft up to 7500 ft. Another big win for the high-res UW weather model, which predicted the clear skies above the cloud deck with very good accuracy despite a marginal forecast from NWS.



On a side note, as usual several snowmobiles were illegally trespassing into the Mount Baker Wilderness (7-8 of them this day). I've grown sick and tired of seeing this behavior repeatedly on the south side of Baker (even on the north side sometimes), and I just couldn't stay silent anymore, so I confronted them (first time ever doing so for me). I forced several of them to stop and informed them as nicely as possible of their violation, at an elevation of 9000 ft and about 1000 ft inside the Wilderness boundary. This included blocking two of those heading uphill to force them to turn around and go back down (four others had already passed uphill just before). The tracks of the four snowmobiles that I did not stop on the uphill continued going to the gap looking into Sherman Crater at 9720 ft, which is about 1500 ft inside the Wilderness boundary. I confronted those four as they came back down a half-hour later -- they stopped directly on top of an obvious sag over a crevasse at 9000 ft, where climbers on foot had punched through earlier. After I informed them of their wilderness violation, their apparent leader refused to acknowledge it and vehemently denied that they were in the Wilderness. I offered to show them the boundary on the map, but also mentioned that they were stopped over an open crevasse. They were like "oh shit", then they gunned it and took off, except a single reasonable one who stopped just below the crevasse and walked back uphill to speak with me and look at the map.


Illegal snowmobilers inside the Mount Baker Wilderness, all of these snowmobiles are at least 1000 ft inside the Wilderness boundary.

The snowmobilers I confronted were of three mindsets: the totally ignorant ("I have no idea where the Wilderness boundary is"), the aggressively wrongheaded (insisting "we have every right to be here, this is legal" -- WRONG), and the lone reasonable person. He had unknowingly crossed the boundary with his group, agreed to look at my map showing the Wilderness boundary while I pointed out the landmarks delineating it, and was apologetic about having transgressed -- I appreciate his attitude greatly.


Map scanned from the official USFS Mount Baker Wilderness Map (2005) and annotated. The Wilderness boundary runs in a straight line from the cliffs which divide the Easton and Deming Glaciers up to the summit of Sherman Peak. This imaginary line is very easy to observe from any location above 7000 ft on the Easton or Deming, and any snowmobile seen to the west of this line is illegally trespassing.

Skiers and snowboarders (and law-abiding snowmobilers too), we need to unite and stand up for what is right, and put a stop to this continual criminal activity by those who feel entitled to trample the rights of all others and to violate the laws which we all must abide by. The wilderness incursions are habitual and ingrained in the snowmobile culture of this area. In the past I've seen as many as a few dozen snowmobiles simultaneously parked in the large flat area near 9500 ft (see map, it's over 600 ft inside the wilderness boundary), eating lunch and tossing beer cans in the snow. I called the Mount Baker Ranger District today to report this latest violation, and was told that a law enforcement officer would call me back later this week.

Anyway, the illegal snowmobiles couldn't put a damper on this magnificent day of skiing and sunshine, floating high on our island continent of snow rising above the sea of clouds.


(Photo by Dave Brown)


Details: Continuing the pattern of most of spring 2011 thus far in the Pacific Northwest, the weather forecast for the Washington Cascades looked marginal for the Memorial Day weekend: mostly cloudy with a chance of showers, snow level 6000 feet. But a weak upper-level ridge of high pressure was forecast for Sunday, and a careful look at the high-res UW weather model showed good things: a true free-air freezing level of 8000 ft above an inversion layer, with clouds in the Mount Baker area clearing out on Saturday evening and then rebuilding only on Sunday mid-afternoon, with very light winds aloft of barely 5-10 mph at 10000 ft. It was time to rally some ski partners -- several phone calls later, I had four: Dave and Stephanie Brown, Kat Cartmell (coming all the way from Leavenworth), and Dave Coleman (ski touring for the first time in over 11 weeks since suffering a severe ankle sprain). I figured that given the recent snowfall and weather, the south side of Baker was likely to have much better snow conditions than the north, with much more consolidation and significantly less avalanche danger, making it worth the longer approach on the snow-covered road: the most recent report I'd read from May 15 had it driveable within about 3 miles.


Climbing through the wispy edge of the cloud deck.

We headed up to Baker on Saturday evening, car camping where 1-2 ft of hardened snow blocked Forest Road 13 at 2750 ft (2.6 miles from the Road 12 junction, and 2.7 miles from the trailhead). We set the alarm for 3:30am, planning a 4:30am departure, and awoke to partly clear skies with a few stars visible. Skinned out just before 5am with skies now overcast, took an hour to reach the trailhead on the road (all on snow except a single ski-length bare patch), and then nearly another hour to break out above the cloud deck at about 3800 ft.


Stephanie skinning above the clouds (the cloud deck was tilted, not the camera).

Took a scenic detour near 4800 ft going up left and across the Railroad Grade moraine and the snowy meadows beyond, to admire the views southwest to the Twin Sisters and down into the gorge of the Deming Glacier from a nice viewpoint near 6000 ft, then aimed back northeast to rejoin the standard route near 6800 ft atop the cleaver dividing the Easton and Deming Glaciers. A pair of painful blisters from the long flat road approach were slowing one of our group greatly, and we stopped several times to apply and reapply first aid.


Looking southwest at Twin Sisters Mountain rising above the cloud deck.


Six-shot panorama of the Deming Glacier and its deep gorge from a viewpoint near 6000 ft.


Skinning up the moraine beside Easton Glacier near 6500 ft. Those are legal snowmobile tracks here.

Then a long slow skin up the Easton and Deming Glaciers towards the crater rim, with the illegal snowmobilers approaching just after noon, while I was several hundred yards ahead of the others -- the decision to confront and speak with them was mine alone, and I was alone when I did so, including standing directly in the path of two of them to prevent them from continuing uphill. The rest of the group could barely overhear portions of the conversation though, and they rejoined me soon afterward at the 9000 ft crevasse.


The sagging snow covers an obvious crevasse at 9000 ft. The spot where the skiers on foot punched through is at lower right, while our group detoured just about 30 ft left to avoid the hazard. This is the location where I confronted the illegal snowmobilers, about 1000 ft inside the wilderness boundary.

The only other skiers on the upper south side of Baker this day were a party of two, who had skinned up to 8700 ft, ditched their skis, and continued unroped on foot towards the summit (we saw them walking down, they didn't make it, turned around due to exhaustion). But at least one of them appeared to have punched a leg through into the crevasse at 9000 ft, so their decision to leave skis behind and walk on foot was clearly almost a fatal one. The crevasse they punched into had a very obvious sag, with much safer sag-less snow only 30 ft farther left, and even had old snowshoe tracks detouring over that way. However, the ski-less skiers on foot chose to blindly pay no heed to all of these clues and needlessly crossed the sag, with a near-tragic result. WTF?!? It's hard not to criticize such behavior -- come on people, glaciers are dangerous!! And though I may someday die on a glacier, perhaps even in an unroped crevasse fall, I know for sure that it won't be while crossing an obvious sag on foot on a clear day with safer ground only a few yards off to the side. You've got to treat the glacier with respect and caution, keep constantly vigilant for hidden hazards, and make proper routefinding decisions -- especially so if you choose to leave the rope and glacier gear behind in the cars as our group did this day.


Another thinly bridged crevasse near 9300 ft, with no sag to mark it, only a hole opened up by the illegal snowmobilers. This spot is also roughly 1000 ft inside the wilderness boundary.

The steeper roll from 9000 to 9400 ft is a typical spot for some crevasse hazard along this route variation, and an open hole in a snowmobile track verified that crevasses were lurking as expected here. A 10-15 mph NW breeze was keeping things cool, even chilly at times, along this stretch. Meanwhile, the cloud deck far below had risen to about 7500 ft, completely obscuring Twin Sisters Mountain, then dropped a bit to unveil the highest of those peaks once more. It was almost 2pm when we reached the crater rim at 9720 ft, finally gazing into the cauldron which had been steaming copiously all day as we climbed.


Kat at the rim of Sherman Crater, with Sherman Peak rising behind on the other side of the crater.

Dave Brown took over the lead and put in a nice skin track up the steep face of the Roman Wall, the smooth snow softened a few inches deep for ideal skinning conditions, with the soft layer well bonded and not sluffing at all. Clouds would occasionally flow over the summit dome and obscure the view, but then clear again minutes later.


Skinning up the summit dome above the Roman Wall, with Sherman Peak far below.

We had planned to go no higher than the summit dome and forgo the traverse over to Grant Peak, but the snow was nice and soft as we approached the dome and the cold breeze actually decreased to barely 5-10 mph, so I caught a second wind above 10600 ft and charged ahead to the true summit just after 3pm. The others soon followed. Quite a party going on up here, with a group of 9 arriving via Boulder Glacier (an unusual mix of skiers, splitboarders, and climbers on foot), plus several groups coming and going from the Coleman-Deming side.


Looking across the summit dome towards Grant Peak, the true summit.



Clouds continued to come and go, blowing over the summit dome from the northwest, so we quickly switched over and skied down just after 3:30pm. Nice soft snow across the edge of the summit dome, minimally wind-affected with no sastrugi or ice.


Nice soft snow on the summit dome above 10600 ft.

Then smooth proto-corn after rolling over onto the steeps of the Roman Wall, very fine turns and totally stable even in mid-afternoon.


Dave Coleman carving up the Roman Wall.


Admiring our ski tracks on the Roman Wall.

Much softer snow below 9400 ft, carving deep trenches as we skied, but at least the snow was not sticky at all. Decent skiing, not bad, still quite fun. We took a long break at 8700 ft, relaxing for an hour in the warm sunshine, melting a few liters of water on the Jetboil to replenish our minimal reserves. Lots of firnspiegel near this elevation.


Skiing past a cool crevasse near 8000 ft.

Then heading back down the slope after 5pm for some more fun turns, as we approached the edge of the cloud deck. We punched into it around 7100 ft, and visibility quickly dropped to 50 ft or less, maybe even 20 ft at times. We followed snowmobile tracks which provided much-needed depth perception, relying on my internal compass to choose between the countless intersecting tracks twisting and curving in every direction across and up and down the slope. The snow was extremely mushy here, with ski penetration of up to a foot during some turns (pole penetration mostly about 12-18"), but no sluffs were caused even on the various steeper rolls. Slow and challenging skiing, with extra caution to avoid injury due to twisting something in the deep mush, but at least the mush was consistent, not unpredictably sticky and grippy as it often is.


Dropping into the dense cloud deck at 7100 ft, the ghostly outline of the summit still barely visible above.

About 45 minutes of stop-and-go whiteout skiing before we finally dropped below the cloud deck at 4000 ft. Then suddenly racing fast and free down the heavily tracked slopes, overjoyed at the renewed gift of clear vision, back down to the flats and the formerly-groomed trail through Schriebers Meadow.


Dropping below the cloud deck.

The long slog out the mostly-flat rolling road turned out to be very painful for the feet at the end of such a big day, taking over 50 minutes to cover the 2.7 miles. Up down, up down, up down the roller coaster of snowmobile-created waves, on and on and on, until finally heading solidly downhill in the last half-mile to the cars. Plus the road now had several bare sections (including one about 30 ft long) which had melted out during the day. The road below 3000 ft may quickly become very discontinuous, so it may be best to wait on doing this route until the road is driveable to the 3.5 mile mark (about 1.8 miles from the trailhead).


This dirty patch had only a ski-length gap in the morning, now melted out to 30+ ft of bare road by day's end.

We were back to the cars just before 7:30pm, about 14.5 hours since we had left. A long and tiring day, over 8200 vert and 20 miles including our scenic detours, but SO NICE to spend most of the day in the sunshine far above the clouds and gloom. And wonderful to find such stable snow conditions, with excellent skiing up high, pretty good at mid-elevations, and tolerable mush lower down. The south side of the Great White Watcher was a great place to ski on the middle day of this holiday weekend.

« Last Edit: 06/01/11, 02:22 AM by Amar Andalkar » Logged

BrianT
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #1 on: 05/31/11, 06:31 AM »

Damn-it Amar,

You've single handily cost me over 1100 bucks, and you're going to cost me more with a trip report like this! You're the reason a dude in TX got into Skiing and more specifically, AT Skiing. Every time I see a TR of you and your pictures you make me wish I lived in WA (I'm working on that part).

On a side-note. Great shots as always, keep up the fantastic work and maybe one of these day i'll get a chance to actually ski with you if I ever get my ass up to WA.

-Brian
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Oyvind_Henningsen
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #2 on: 05/31/11, 08:33 AM »

Most excellent Amar, Kat, Dave C, Dave B, and Stephanie!!!!
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Lytt til erfarne fjellfolk!
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #3 on: 05/31/11, 10:10 AM »

Great trip selection for threading the weather window.  Big day.
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jhamaker
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #4 on: 05/31/11, 11:14 AM »

Thank you for taking the time out to educate the sled-heads.  I've found *education* is the key.  Be nice, leave a positive impression so folks *want* to change not rebel.
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old guy
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #5 on: 05/31/11, 11:52 AM »

Excellent trip report.  I was on the rescue yesterday and we went up to 7,900 to check crevasses.  Saw your tracks.  It was obvious your snow conditions were better on Monday then on Tuesday.  We had a death grip on our skis coming down.
I like your comments on the crevasses there are a lot of them lurking just under the surface so please don't just blindly travel the glaciers thinking everywhere is safe. 
I agree with your comments about the snowmobliers encroaching into the wilderness boundary and kudos for you to confront them on it.  But a note to skiers - there are some excellent environmentally minded snowmobilers out there.  We were working with a group of Skagit snowmobilers and I was impressed to see a couple of them stopping to pick up other people's trash.  Don't forget there are good and bad apples in every basket.  I have see a lot of skier's camps filled with trash so lets be careful not to sound like biggoted or arrogant ski mountaineers.
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Scotsman
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #6 on: 05/31/11, 06:31 PM »

The wilderness boundary lines obviously were demarcation lines marked on a map rather than accommodating the natural topography. They come to an apex on a steep slope.

Wouldn't it make more sense to rearrange the boundary lines so that the sledders had a natural flat place to stop such as where Amar has marked on his map ( and they seems to be stopping anyway) That way they can finish their legal trip at a place where it makes sense and provides a natural stopping point rather than a narrowing triangle.

Put the shoe on your other for a minute and consider this mental exercise...... if this boundary line applied to skiers not sledders...........you are skinning and there is a natural col or saddle ahead that would seem a natural turn around point to start your descent but because of a legal boundary that was set with no regard to topography you are legally required to stop and turn around before reaching the col or saddle.....how many skiers would not stop and continue to the col.... be honest with yourself.

I for one wouldn't mind giving up a thousand feet of wilderness to make the snowmobile legal area more sensible and enjoyable for them. I'm sure its not feasible and will never happen but it's nice to dream that practicality will one day override ideology. Sometimes we have to share.

Edit : Corrected Amar's name because he sent me a pm complaining I was spelling his name wrong and disrespecting him on purpose.
« Last Edit: 05/31/11, 09:02 PM by Scotsman » Logged

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Amar Andalkar
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #7 on: 05/31/11, 09:40 PM »

The wilderness boundary lines obviously were demarcation lines marked on a map rather than accommodating the natural topography. They come to an apex on a steep slope.

Wouldn't it make more sense to rearrange the boundary lines so that the sledders had a natural flat place to stop such as where Amar has marked on his map ( and they seems to be stopping anyway) That way they can finish their legal trip at a place where it makes sense and provides a natural stopping point rather than a narrowing triangle.

Put the shoe on your other for a minute and consider this mental exercise...... if this boundary line applied to skiers not sledders...........you are skinning and there is a natural col or saddle ahead that would seem a natural turn around point to start your descent but because of a legal boundary that was set with no regard to topography you are legally required to stop and turn around before reaching the col or saddle.....how many skiers would not stop and continue to the col.... be honest with yourself.

I for one wouldn't mind giving up a thousand feet of wilderness to make the snowmobile legal area more sensible and enjoyable for them. I'm sure its not feasible and will never happen but it's nice to dream that practicality will one day override ideology. Sometimes we have to share.

Edit : Corrected Amar's name because he sent me a pm complaining I was spelling his name wrong and disrespecting him on purpose.

I sent you a PM asking you if you were misspelling my name on purpose, which is a reasonable question given the roughly half-dozen times you've recently misspelled it in posts here. Anyway...

Really Scotsman, you're bending over backwards to accommodate this use needlessly. The snowmobilers already have countless flat spots to stop within the legal Baker NRA boundary, including a large flat area near 8900 ft which is just within the boundary. This is along the most natural snowmo corridor too, which follows the broad smooth section of glacier along the Easton-Squak border (on the map above, this is the path along which the 7400, 7600, 7800, 8000, 8200, 8400, 8600, 8800 contour numbers are written). You may not mind giving up wilderness left and right, but thankfully others do mind, and strongly so.

Thinking logically on the issue (this is NOT necessarily my personal opinion), the legal snowmobiling area on Baker is already much too large. This appears to have been a huge erroneous misguided giveaway to an inappropriate, highly-polluting, special-interest activity with a powerful political lobby when the Mount Baker Wilderness boundary was set in 1984. If any adjustments need to be made, it should be in the other direction. A much more logical place to draw the boundary would be perhaps along the 6000 ft contour, which is already marked in red on the official USFS Mount Baker Wilderness Map (see the full map) as the lower limit for camping outside designated campsites. This would make a logical upper limit for snowmobile use, as it would keep them safely off the crevassed portions of glaciers, while still providing plenty of open non-forested terrain for them. My observations over many years (including this trip) show that most are clearly unable to travel safely in glaciated terrain (other than by pure chance and luck), and there have been several snowmobiles which have fallen into crevasses on the south side of Baker over the years.

Scotsman, I would think that you'd be more concerned about the safety of snowmobilers, and so would be a strong advocate of keeping them safely off the glaciers. A machine weighing roughly 500-700 lbs (with a total weight of about 800-1000 lbs including the typical rider, their gear, and fuel) presents a huge risk of breaking through a snowbridge into a hidden crevasse.


Meanwhile, the USFS law enforcement officer has contacted me today by email, asking for photos, especially any which show readable snowmobile registration numbers (usually found on the side of the snowmobile body). Unfortunately and ironically, the only fully readable registration number in any of my numerous photos is on the snowmobile of the one reasonable person who took the time to stop and learn about the Wilderness boundary (I got a couple other partial numbers in photos when they were stopped atop the crevasse). That's just how it goes I guess, the more innocent offenders may get punished while the worse, more recalcitrant offenders go free, purely through the random chance of what my lens caught.

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Lowell_Skoog
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #8 on: 05/31/11, 09:56 PM »

Thinking logically on the issue (this is NOT necessarily my personal opinion), the legal snowmobiling area on Baker is already much too large. This appears to have been a huge erroneous misguided giveaway to an inappropriate, highly-polluting, special-interest activity with a powerful political lobby when the Mount Baker Wilderness boundary was set in 1984. If any adjustments need to be made, it should be in the other direction.

+1

This might not be your personal opinion, but it IS mine. Snowmobiling on Mt Baker is a travesty.

Great report. Nice call on the weather.
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Scotsman
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #9 on: 05/31/11, 10:23 PM »

Well as Lou Dawson says in his Wild Snow blog when commenting on the criticism  to his son Louie's snow mobile assisted skiing on Mt Baker.
Quote}
But I’d agree with anyone that shared use is something we’ll be refining over coming years. Meanwhile, with the vast quantities of legal Wilderness we have, we already have plenty of un-shared use and I for one appreciate it — as I do the areas where we can share, and sled, and drive, etc. etc… End Quote.

If it's OK with Lou...it's Ok with me Wink
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mick_scott
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #10 on: 06/01/11, 01:41 AM »

+1

This might not be your personal opinion, but it IS mine. Snowmobiling on Mt Baker is a travesty.




+2
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #11 on: 06/01/11, 05:56 AM »

Well as Lou Dawson says in his Wild Snow blog when commenting on the criticism  to his son Louie's snow mobile assisted skiing on Mt Baker.
Quote}
But I’d agree with anyone that shared use is something we’ll be refining over coming years. Meanwhile, with the vast quantities of legal Wilderness we have, we already have plenty of un-shared use and I for one appreciate it — as I do the areas where we can share, and sled, and drive, etc. etc… End Quote.

If it's OK with Lou...it's Ok with me Wink

I'm not sure what Lou Dawson says is relevant and I don't care. The Seattle area passive/aggresive behavior seems to be rubbing off on you Chris.
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #12 on: 06/01/11, 06:58 AM »

Wow! As always Amar great trip and photos. We tried this exact route last Saturday in pretty poor weather; turned around at 8200 in a complete white out. Glad to see someone got the goods.

The road is definitely an added challenge to this route, with over 2 miles of flat, mushy snow to skin/ski down after the long hike.
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ryanl
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #13 on: 06/01/11, 07:35 AM »

Great trip Amar, Daves, Stephanie and Kat! And nice write up Amar- lots of respect for your thoughts and the way you express them.
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Chuck C
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #14 on: 06/01/11, 08:13 AM »



This might not be your personal opinion, but it IS mine. Snowmobiling on Mt Baker is a travesty.




You can add St Helens to that travesty list as well.
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Dustin_B
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #15 on: 06/01/11, 08:56 AM »

You can add St Helens to that travesty list as well.

Speaking of which, when I skied St Helens several weeks ago we saw a group of around a dozen snomos inside the snomo free wedge on the south side. My buddy and I confronted this group and talked to a couple of them. We encountered the totally ignorant attitude (and the rest didn't stop). "I'm just following my buddies." "We're just crossing through." "We were told to steer clear of skiers and be respectful of them." (which they were not). All direct quotes.

I did however take several photos of the violators (and the surrounding terrain as land marks) hoping we would see a ranger along the way. We did not. I'm assuming the registration number on snomos is rather small and my shots from 30 feet away wouldn't do much to identify them.

But to not make this post a complete thread drift from Amar's trip report.... Awesome pics as usual. That is a big day! And agreed with the above posters about education to snowmoers. We tried this approach, although I don't feel we actually changed any behavior.



* helens_snomo_1.jpg (122.5 KB, 1000x750 - viewed 2865 times.)
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #16 on: 06/01/11, 02:54 PM »

Nice! great to hear Dave's back on skis again!
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ashcan
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #17 on: 06/01/11, 04:59 PM »

+1

This might not be your personal opinion, but it IS mine. Snowmobiling on Mt Baker is a travesty.



+ Another



Meanwhile, the USFS law enforcement officer has contacted me today by email, asking for photos, especially any which show readable snowmobile registration numbers (usually found on the side of the snowmobile body).


Thanks Amar, I'll keep this mind.
Great trip report too.
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #18 on: 06/01/11, 06:23 PM »

Amar,
Great tr and pics and thank you for confronting the sledders. This is not an isolated occurrence and happens all over the state. A grave travesty that they are allowed on Mt. Baker, St. Helens, Adams, etc.
This is just going to cause the ultimate regulation of where they will be allowed to go in the future. I just don't understand why the law breakers continue to do this year after year and the legal sledders don't put a stop to it themselves before the Forest Service does.
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #19 on: 06/01/11, 06:52 PM »

Thanks Amar for another absolutely  fantastic trip report and photos!!

Got to get my self up north and do the big B..

I'm thinking that the bad apples might be outnumbering the good ones, at least down here in Central Oregon ( the good ones must feel outnumbered hence not stepping up to the plate..).

Was skiing Bach yesterday and heaps of ripped up future corn from the bad apples (must be the folks saving spots at Dutchman Parking for their 4 day snomoe shindig).

+++++!
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Paul_Russell
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #20 on: 06/01/11, 10:14 PM »

Thanks for the great report Amar.  I am in complete agreement with restricting the access area for snowmobilers on the Easton glacier.  Several years ago, I was involved in an incident on the Easton where a snowmobiler had fallen into a crevasse with his machine, and we rescued him on our descent.  As you noted, snowmobilers are ill equipped for glacier travel and are at considerable risk of breaking through snow bridges with their weight.   We were the last skiers on the mountain that day, and he would not have likely survived.  While I personally agree it is a travesty to have snowmobilers in that area, it is also a significant safety and liability concern.  I recall that the snowmobiler had their insurance company involved and wanted to recover the machine.

http://www.turns-all-year.com/skiing_snowboarding/trip_reports/index.php?topic=1439.0
« Last Edit: 06/02/11, 06:33 AM by Paul_Russell » Logged
Atraslin
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #21 on: 06/02/11, 11:58 AM »

What an in depth report.

Can you explain what proto
Corn is.


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daveb
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #22 on: 06/02/11, 03:13 PM »

Great TR Amar and fully accurate account of my observations as well.  Thanks for your articulate account of the day.  Glad I got that photo of you skiing the Roman Wall above the clouds and Black Buttes!
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jjnorm
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #23 on: 06/02/11, 04:15 PM »

Great TR, and thank you for confronting our motorized counterparts, its a long way to climb only to have to cough on engine exhaust and listen to noise pollution.
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Scotsman
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Re: May 29, 2011, Mt Baker, Easton Above the Clouds
« Reply #24 on: 06/02/11, 05:03 PM »


Can you explain what proto
Corn is.



proto-
combining form 

Original; primitive
- prototherian
- prototype

First; anterior; relating to a precursor
- protomartyr
- protozoan

Core skier talk for snow that is on its way to becoming corn but is not yet corn!
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